Banksy + 5: October 17th

October 17th, 2013 | By | 1 Comment »
Banksy in Brooklyn. Photo by carnagenyc.

Banksy in Brooklyn. Photo by carnagenyc.

Today’s Better Out Than In piece only lasted for a few minutes after it was announced before it was defaced, which is too bad because it’s really a great example of how a simple intervention with the right placement can be great. Banksy is one of the best at this sort of thing.

Today Swoon, Zap, Mygalo, Sweet Toof, Paul Insect and one unknown artist make up our + 5:

Swoon. Photo by Alex Ellison.

Swoon in London. Photo by Alex Ellison.

Zap in Paris. Photo by vitostreet.

Zap in Paris. Photo by vitostreet.

Mygalo in Paris. Photo by vitostreet.

Mygalo in Paris. Photo by vitostreet.

Sweet Toof and Paul Insect. Photo by liborius.

Sweet Toof and Paul Insect in London. Photo by liborius.

Iztok Alf Kurnik in Cádiz, Spain. Photo by Iztok Alf Kurnik.

Unknown artist in Cádiz, Spain. Photo by Iztok Alf Kurnik.

Photos by carnagenyc, Alex Ellison, vitostreet, liborius and Iztok Alf Kurnik


Category: Photos | Tags: , , , , , ,

Banksy + 5: October 2nd

October 2nd, 2013 | By | 2 Comments »
Banksy on 25th Street between 10th and 11th Avenue. Photo by Luna Park. Click to view large.

Banksy on 25th Street between 10th and 11th Avenue. Photo by Luna Park. Click to view large.

So I know that late last night I said that I didn’t expect we would be covering all of Banksy’s new NYC work on this blog (also, did you somehow miss that he’s doing a bunch of work in NYC in October for his Better Out Than In project?). I said that we’d probably just be sending out links on Facebook or that I’d be tweeting about it. But then Jonathan Lynn from Anewspace in Dublin tweeted an idea at me: “you should do a column called ‘this is the new banksy & here is 5 more artists who painted today’”.

Banksy + 5 is a slight twist on Jonathan’s idea. Every time a new Banksy work for Better Out Than In is discovered, I’m going to post a photo of that work, as well as 5 photos of street art by other artists. The photos will be photos are sent to me or were uploaded to Flickr the day before the latest Banksy piece. So, for example, today’s Banksy + 5 includes the latest Banksy (the “New York Accent” stencil shown above) and 5 photos that were uploaded to Flickr on October 1st.

For today’s +5 we have NiceOne, Kid Acne, El Mac, Loretto and a collaborative piece by Shuby, Rowdy and Sweet Toof next to a piece by Eine:

NiceOne. Photo by Christmas Junkie.

NiceOne. Photo by Christmas Junkie.

Kid Acne. Photo by Kyla Borg.

Kid Acne. Photo by Kyla Borg.

El Mac. Photo by bernardoh.

El Mac. Photo by bernardoh.

Loretto. Photo by Sarflondondunc.

Loretto. Photo by Sarflondondunc.

Shuby, Rowdy and Sweet Toof next to Eine. Photo by Delete.

Shuby, Rowdy and Sweet Toof next to Eine. Photo by Delete.

Want to digitally side-bust Banksy and get some attention by being featured in a Banksy + 5 post? Get up, take some photos, and send them my way (rj a-t vandalog dot com).

Photos by Luna Park, Christmas Junkie, Kyla Borg, bernardoh, Sarflondondunc and Delete


Category: Photos | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Weekend link-o-rama

September 7th, 2013 | By | 4 Comments »
Paul Insect and Sweet Toof

Paul Insect and Sweet Toof (and Sope)

For me, school is back in session. Hopefully everyone else out there is still enjoying the tail end of the summer. Here’s some art to keep your weekend interesting:

  • Martha Cooper and I have announced our picks for the MOCAtv Upload More Art challenge. You uploaded your street art videos, and we selected our favorites. I used the opportunity to highlight videos of Enzo & Nio and A.CE. As you can probably guess when you watch me explain my picks, I made those picks during Illegal August, so those sorts of thoughts were on my mind. Martha Cooper also selected two videos to highlight.
  • Just because Colossal Media paints murals based on designs by people like KAWS and Faile doesn’t mean there should be any love for them. They paint advertisements. That is their business. If they paint some murals on the side, that doesn’t excuse billboards invading public space. Unless you think BP sponsoring art exhibits excuses oil spills and pollution…
  • Also what’s up with KAWS’ work being used for a mural (I hesitate to say he did a mural, since it appears all he did was license his imagery)? He’s spent the better part of this site’s existence distancing himself from street art and graffiti and his public art has consisted of sculptures and flyposted advertisements (if you consider that public art).
  • Maybe I’ll be able to ask KAWS about all this myself soon, since presumably he’ll be in Philadelphia for his show at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Arrested Motion has a bit of a preview, but I think the link really worth checking is PAFA’s website (and this archived version of the same page from mid-August) because of this section of the show description which has since been removed: “Placing KAWS’ sculptural works throughout PAFA’s historic galleries will further the ‘graffiti effect,’” and the edit of (emphasis added) “KAWS grew up in Jersey City, where he emerged as a graffiti artist in the early 1990s.” to “KAWS grew up in Jersey City, where he emerged as an artist in the early 1990s.” So that’s interesting.
  • I’ve never been a big fan of Elle’s work, but I do love this ad takeover.
  • And here are more ad takeovers, these from Jordan Seiler.
  • So many nice graffiti pieces on Ekosystem today.
  • I really like this new print from Shepard Fairey.
  • Pablo Delgado tiny pieces alway makes me smile.
  • Speak of small street art, here’s BSA’s take on the subject.
  • FAME Festival is no more, although ad hoc projects will continue to be organized in the town of Grottaglie, Italy by festival organizer Angelo Milano. It’s definitely sad news, but Angelo is always ahead of the times. Maybe this glut of street art festivals is just too much. Maybe it’s time for something different. Let’s hope Angelo figures it out. I can’t wait to see what he tries next.

Photo by Alex Ellison


Category: Art News, Festivals, Gallery/Museum Shows, Photos, Print Release, Random, Vandalog Projects, Videos | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Weekend link-o-rama

August 9th, 2013 | By | 1 Comment »
Gold Peg

Gold Peg

What am I missing? Because I don’t have much to add this week for the link-o-rama. It’s the middle of summer? Aren’t people getting up? Am I just not seeing it?

  • Horfe and Coney/Ken Sortais went wild in an abandoned swimming pool.
  • Sweet Toof is understandably upset that a recent mural project in Hackney, where he and the rest of the Burning Candy crew painted some of their best illegal street art and graffiti, intentionally avoided including local artists. You’ve gotta love this quote from Sarah Weir, who heads the charity that commissioned the new murals: “We unashamedly wanted to showcase the best international artists and transform this part of the canal into a destination for street art.” That might be the dumbest thing I’ve read all summer, except for course for arguments defending the NSA or calling for Edward Snowden to return to the USA. First of all, murals (while interesting) emulate street art and graffiti, but there is a distinct difference between legal murals by street artists and illegal street art by the same artists. I’m sure that on Vandalog I have referred to murals as street art for the sake of simplicity, but not in a context like this where the difference between murals and street art is actually quite important. Hackney Wick’s canal already is a destination for street art, in large part due to the work of Gold Peg, Sweet Toof and the other members of Burning Candy. Weir is trying to turn it into a destination for murals, most likely at the expense of street art and graffiti if the intense pre-Olympics graffiti removal efforts in the area are anything to go by. Mural projects and festival are awesome, but they are not the same thing as illegal street art or graffiti.
  • Israel Hernandez, an 18-year-old Miami graffiti writer, was killed this week when he was tazered by police. They were chasing him after catching him writing in an abandoned building. CNN’s coverage of Hernandez’ death was surprisingly fair. Their piece was framed as the tragedy that is clearly is, rather than a piece demonizing Hernandez for his artwork like you might expect from some mainstream media.

Photo by Alex Ellison


Category: Art Fairs, Festivals, Photos, Random | Tags: , , , ,

Paul Insect and Sweet Toof clowning around

August 1st, 2013 | By | No Comments »

I was just there a couple of months ago, but I’m already missing London. For now, this video of Paul Insect and Sweet Toof will just have to do.


Category: Videos | Tags: ,

Sweet Toof, Paul Insect, and Lush in Mexico

April 24th, 2013 | By | 1 Comment »
paulinsect-toof.2

Paul Insect and Sweet Toof

Sweet Toof, Paul Insect, and Lush met up in Mexico for some fun and a lot of painting. So much good work. You can find it yourself in Mexico City and some of the surrounding suburbs, but I’ve got a lot of it here too…

Paul Insect

Paul Insect

Lush, Sweet Toof, and Paul Insect

Lush, Sweet Toof, and Paul Insect

PAINTING MEX

Paul Insect and Sweet Toof

Paul Insect and Sweet Toof

Read the rest of this article »


Category: Featured Posts, Photos | Tags: , ,

Tim Hans shoots… Sweet Toof

March 18th, 2013 | By | No Comments »

Sweet Toof 1

The secretive Sweet Toof recently invited Tim Hans over to his studio as part of Tim’s continuing series of photo-portraits of street artists, and Caroline Caldwell has interviewed the artist.

Caroline Caldwell: What influenced you to do street art? Do you remember your first time?

Sweet Toof: No one forgets the first time, its like sex, started in 1986, and still at it. I blame Beat Street and Style Wars.

C: Do you try to do different things with your work or do let it evolve naturally?

ST: It is always good to experiment, working on the street fuels the studio work. One feeds another, what ever it takes a fat roller to a fine brush. The work evolves from mission to mission.

Sweet Toof 2

C: Burning Candy represents like a graffiti crew however the work is almost entirely character based. When Burning Candy was coming together, was there discussion over whether you all identified as a “graffiti” or “street art” crew?

ST: I left BC 3 years ago…. Burning Candy is what you see is what you get. We are like minded people working with characters, letterforms, tags, pieces, throw ups. Canvas sculpture print etc.

C: What’s one of the most interesting experiences you’ve had painting alone?

ST: Sinking in Quicksand was a strange experience.

Sweet Toof 3

C: And what about when you were painting with someone else?

ST: New York with friends was killer.

C: Have you been working on anything or collaborating with anyone lately?

ST: Working on a new body of work at present, watch this space for the rest.

Photos by Tim Hans


Category: Interview, Portraits by Tim Hans | Tags: ,

Weekend link-o-rama

March 2nd, 2013 | By | 2 Comments »
Dart, PC, Curve, Rams, and Sane

Dart, PC, Curve, Rams, and Sane

As I’ve been gearing up for midterms, I’ve missed posting some great outdoor work (and other things) this week.

Photo by Carnagenyc


Category: Art News, Events, Gallery/Museum Shows, Photos, Random, Toys, Videos | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Jester Jacques Gallery pop up print sale in Shoreditch

January 17th, 2013 | By | 1 Comment »
Sweet Toof

Sweet Toof

Starting Feb. 7th at 6pm, Jester Jacques Gallery will be hosting a pop up sale in Boxpark Shoreditch. The lineup, including Philip HarrisMighty MoMister MillerchipShepard FaireySweet ToofJon BurgermanAdorJimmy CMarcus PetterssonRosemary Cronin and others were, as Jester Jacques puts it, “chosen for their investment potential and contemporary relevance” to the street art scene. The featured prints look great, but what does that matter if they’re intended to be bought as street art stock? And if you are trying to buy some street art stock, you’re probably a couple of years too late.

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey

Jon Burgerman

Jon Burgerman

Photos courtesy of Jester Jacques


Category: Gallery/Museum Shows | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

The Street Museum of Art’s guerrilla curating in NYC

September 11th, 2012 | By | 3 Comments »

The Street Museum of Art (SMoA) has announced the debut of it’s first exhibit In Plain Sight. What that means is that some street art fan or fans have put up the outdoor equivalent to gallery wall labels in order to help identify, draw attention to and explain a few selected pieces of street art. ForIn Plain Sight, the curator(s) have included work by Sweet Toof, Faile, Gaia, JR and others.

This could really easily come across as ridiculous and cheesy, but I think the SMoA have pulled off one of the best actions demonstrating both the necessity and impossibility of displaying street art in a museum setting. On some level, wall labels for street art are absurd, but on another level they are quite useful. And rather than trying to create some sort of fake and inevitably lesser copy of the street indoors (like the installations by Neckface or Todd James, Barry McGee and Stephen Powers at Art in the Streets) or organizing murals that again emulate some of the look of street art but not the energy behind it (like the murals organized for Os Gemeos recently in Boston), the SMoA have just brought the museum to the street, as if to say “Here is the real thing. It cannot be imitated in a museum environment. But it is as valuable to our culture as what you might see in MoMA.” Maybe the SMoA will help people to see things that they haven’t before, and then maybe they’ll start noticing street art everywhere without the help of wall labels.In Plain Sight elevates street art both to make a strong statement about the art and benefit viewers. It’s like a mini version of the street art tours that Stephanie and I have offered in London, but free and self-guided. Great stuff.

The one disappointing thing I have found about In Plain Sight is that it takes place in Williamsburg. Of course there is a lot of great street art there, but I think a lot higher proportion of Williamsburg residents are probably aware of street art already. But hey, even a jaded hipster might be willing to learn something new about Sweet Toof if the text is right in front of her.

I’m curious to see what the SMoA does next.

Also, I’d like to compare what the SMoA is doing to what some street artists in Australia did last weekend.

The artist CDH organized a “Trojan petition” where a group of street artists petitioned the city of Melbourne and the government of Victoria because of unfair graffiti laws in Victoria. The petition was delivered as part of an installation to which 20 street artists had contributed artwork which surrounded the text of the petition. Essentially, these artists say that the laws regarding being found with spraypaint or markers on your person are unfair as they reverse the burden of proof to a presumption of guilt instead of innocence (this seems true), and that property owners who do not take care of their property effectively give permission for artists to paint it (an interesting argument). But they delivered this petition in a really weird way by dropping it outside of a major museum and, for some reason I don’t quite understand, seem to pit museums against street artists even though museums in Australia have been some of the strongest allies of street artists over the last few years (the petition states “Melbourne’s street art is consistently ranked among the top in the world [1-6], unlike any of Australia’s fine art institutions.”). The National Gallery of Victoria, where the petition was delivered, has actually decided to display the work until Friday. So, the gallery where the petition was delivered seems to support the street artists…

There’s more info and a more positive view of the petition over at Invurt, and I think Luke may be writing something about it as well in the coming days for Vandalog. But I just thought I’d bring up that comparison of two groups almost simultaneously trying to make a point about the legitimacy of street art as art that should be appreciated by people and supported by the state or institutions, and making that point in two very different ways. The Trojan petition seems to take a very negative approach and the SMoA takes a very positive approach. Which one do you like better? Although I can enjoy anger from time to time, I think SMoA made similar points a hell of a lot better by staying positive and improving the streets.

Photos courtesy of the Street Museum of Art


Category: Art News, Featured Posts | Tags: , , , , ,