All Your Walls – Hosier Lane – Melbourne (Stage 2)

January 27th, 2014 | By | 4 Comments »
Taylurk. Photo by David Russell.

Taylurk. Photo by David Russell.

I am extremely late with this post, it’s been a busy last month or so, but I wanted to share the 2nd session of All Your Walls Melbourne, a satellite event we ran in late November as a part of the MELBOURNE NOW exhibition held by the National Gallery of Victoria. You can read all about the event in my previous post here.

The final 3 days were definitely not as hectic, I’d say that is due to the fact we didn’t have 6 massive scissor lifts moving around the lanes all day, but it was a great way to finish off the event.

Artists starting arriving early on the 1st day and worked all the way up until the official opening. The last 3 days of the event attracted thousands of visitors coming to see the finished laneways. All stakeholders were delighted with the final result, a full repaint of the entire Hosier and Rutledge Lane precinct, something that has never been done before. The event also received some great reviews.

Check out this great video from EdInFocus that gives you a good idea of what the event was all about.

All Your Walls Recap Video from EdInFocus on Vimeo.

From my personal perspective the importance of this event extended beyond the event itself. Rutledge Lane (Hosier’s lesser known cousin) has become known as a “practice lane” due to the poor quality of the work being painted there. All Your Walls showed Melbourne that Rutledge Lane can be just as good as Hosier Lane and in my opinion should remain that way. It was a refreshing sight to see that for several weeks after the event the work was respected (usually it gets tagged and painted over by complete rubbish, that does not deserve to be in the lane, again in my opinion). It was also both surprising and pleasing to see that local artists have begun to maintain the lanes, without being asked.

My feelings about Rutledge Lane are in line with my recent submission/response to the Melbourne City Council Graffiti Management Policy. Melbourne City Council recently proposed officially classifying Rutledge lane as a practice lane, which I was strongly opposed to. Encouraging this behaviour encourages a “do as you wish” attitude in Rutledge lane, which before All Your Walls was at it’s worst state in a long time. (Adrian Doyle’s Empty Nursery Blue project also had an impact on this lane). [The policy also contains some great ideas and a fresh new attitude towards street art in Melbourne, for example now the council will leave street art alone, unless asked. Previously the council would contact building owners and ask if they would like it removed. I think this is a pretty progressive attitude for a council, even though the council knows that Melbourne would not be the same without street art].

One other important thing I would like to clear up, especially for my readers in Melbourne. While All Your Walls was indeed organised by a number of parties (NGV, Land of Sunshine, Invurt, Just Another Agency and Hosier INC), Hosier and Rutledge lanes remain free for ANYONE to paint, anytime. That being said, don’t cap what you can’t burn, seriously, what an embarrassment some of the tags and pieces are over the top of some REAL work.

Check out some of the amazing work from the final 3 days as well as the amazing 3D mapping piece created by DVATE and Grant Osborne.

Senekt. Photo by Dean Sunshine.

Senekt. Photo by Dean Sunshine.

Putos. Photo by David Russell.

Putos. Photo by David Russell.

Peril. Photo by David Russell.

Peril. Photo by David Russell.

Paris. Photo by David Russell.

Paris. Photo by David Russell.

Otis Chamberlain. Photo by Dean Sunshine.

Otis Chamberlain. Photo by Dean Sunshine.

Marian Machismo. Photo by David Russell.

Marian Machismo. Photo by David Russell.

Junky Projects and Presto. Photo by David Russell.

Junky Projects and Presto. Photo by David Russell.

Facter. Photo by Dean Sunshine.

Facter. Photo by Dean Sunshine.

Ero. Photo by David Russell.

Ero. Photo by David Russell.

Creature Creature. Photo by Dean Sunshine.

Creature Creature. Photo by Dean Sunshine.

CALM and Sticky Fingers. Photo by Dean Sunshine.

CALM and Sticky Fingers. Photo by Dean Sunshine.

Adnate. Photo by Dean Sunshine.

Adnate. Photo by Dean Sunshine.

DVATE + Grant Osborne + Project-Shaun > graffiti mapping collaboration from Grant Osborne on Vimeo.

Photos courtesy of David Russell and Dean Sunshine.

Video courtesy of EdInFocus and Grant Osborne.


Category: Photos, Videos | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
  • CDH

    There’s tagging and then there’s street art. People who came after Banksy don’t even question this distinction, but when I started painting, they were both the same thing: graffiti.
    Amac created the only defacto legal space for tagging in Melbourne and that was a radical gesture. You’re now trying to take that away. You’re trying to remove the mechanisms that bring up the next generation and you’re further marginalizing the people most dispossessed of influence. One type of graffiti is used to erase another. This abuses art because rather than bringing people together, it’s used as a tool for suppressing other types of cultural production.
    In the 80s there was a legal tagging wall in the City Square. In the 90s/2000s Amac carved out Rutledge. Now we seem to be taking this retrograde step of removing it all and declaring tagging and taggers as just inherently lesser. Who advocates the interests of taggers in this process?
    You, Fletch, Dean and Toby put a lot of work into All Your Walls, and that was a great thing. You did a really awesome job. But you’ve got to be careful that you don’t just ‘recuperate’ Hosier into a more appealing tourist novelty for the City and sell out everything that makes graffiti interesting. It’s nice to pretend that everything’s great but in reality Melbourne’s street art is becoming insipid and obsequious as it moves into shopping malls.

  • Luke

    CDH. I love both street art and tagging. And I’m not trying to take ANYTHING away. I’m not sure how you came to this conclusion.

    If you’re going to do something, do it well. I don’t draw or write on the streets, because I can’t. I do in a private sketch book at home, but NOONE sees that, cos if they did I would die of embarrassment. What a waste of time, energy and paint. In my opinion.

    Practice your craft, but not by being jealous of others who can paint and destroying their work. Again my opinion.

    Perhaps I don’t understand because I’m not an “artist” or a writer, but I don’t claim to be one. These kids that can’t paint, I think they think they can? They can’t. I know that much.

    I absolutely love a good tag. And I mean LOVE them. In fact just as much as street art and graff pieces, and a good throwie as well. Who advocates for taggers, I do. Like I said I love them. But I don’t like shit. I know what I like. I love the mix of street art, tags, throwies and pieces. And I agree, that’s a fundamental part of the attraction for me.

    I personally would never waste my money time or effort on something I don’t do right. But maybe that’s just me.

    My mission in Hosier is not that at all. My mission is to bring back some respect and order, which is apparently a part of “graffiti”, self sustaining and self governance. Maybe it’s the wrong place to start. Have some respect, don’t paint shit, practice until you can. In my opinion, these people are an embarrassment to themselves. But again, that’s just me.

    The city of Melbourne has promoted this lane as a “practice” spot for Melbourne. And I disagree with that. That’s a big part of the reason why it often looks so shit. It used to look awesome.

  • RAWHIDE

    The only thing embarrassing is your outspoken, contradictory and shitty opinions. I cant imagine what interest the international audience of Vandalog have in the politics of a single lane in Melbourne, as well as the way you’ve expressed this situation. Keep your uneducated thoughts to yourself, mate.

  • Luke

    Thanks for having an opinion. What was contradictory? (Or contradictory and shitty for that matter?). And how so? If you’ve read my articles, you’ll note that I also believe this is only one lane, iconic only in the public’s mind (not in the graff or street art community AT ALL – but has an incredible history). I have a connection this lane, which means I also have an opinion. CDH’s response was very articulate and well written. Please explain yours!! :)