HOTTEA hits NYC

August 27th, 2013 | By | 2 Comments »
HOTTEA in Williamsburg

HOTTEA in Williamsburg

Minneapolis-based yarnbomber HOTTEA was busy in NYC last week. It was great to have him back in town. I only wish that his amazing work on the Williamsburg Bridge had lasted longer. Sadly, I never got to see more than just a few remnants. But there are other works:

On the West 4th Street basketball court

On the West 4th Street basketball court

In Bushwick

In Bushwick

Photos by Dani Mozeson


Category: Photos | Tags: ,

Star Wars yarn bomb

December 31st, 2012 | By | 2 Comments »

Yarn-bombing-R2D2-in-in-Bellingham-Washington-USA-2

The last time I wrote about yarn bombing, I criticized the lack of differentiation in the craft and was skeptical of it being classified as “street art”. Even with that bias, I find this R2D2 yarn bomb absolutely brilliant. The piece was up in Bellingham, Washington and created by Sarah Rudder for International Yarn Bombing Day. As cool as it is, the piece was only left up for the day before the artist took it back home to reuse it and improve it for next year (expect speakers and legs). That’s fair, I would probably want to hold on to something that looked that awesome too. “Even if I had left it out to weather the elements, R2D2 is made out of an acrylic yarn that wouldn’t bleed, fade, or stretch for quite some time,” the artist says on her blog. It’s great that she put that in that consideration, but the piece wasn’t left up so it doesn’t make too much of a difference. As incredible as it looks, this supports the criticism that yarn bombing is a “do it for the photo” method of street art.

Yarn-bombing-R2D2-in-in-Bellingham-Washington-USA-1

Yarn-bombing-R2D2-in-in-Bellingham-Washington-USA-3

Photos by Sarah Rudder

Via Street Art Utopia


Category: Photos | Tags: , ,

Yarn bombing: You can’t sit with us

November 13th, 2012 | By | 28 Comments »

Photo by StreetsDept

Conrad Benner of Streets Dept. noted that yarn bombing is probably one of the most verbally attacked forms of street art and in my experience, he’s right. Actually, most of the hate I hear comes from other street artists. Why? As Jason Eppink puts it, “Yarn bombing exemplifies the ‘do it for the photo’ method of street art. There’s a disingenuousness. … It’s bright and colorful for a day, then it looks gross and someone else has to clean it up.” And it’s no beautiful decay, like the withering of wheatpastes or chipping paint. Personally, I always feel a bit uncomfortable with the awareness that someone put in a disproportionate amount of hours to make such a short-lived mess. Yarn bombers, why not document your pieces a week after you put them up (or the places where they had formerly been) and tell us if this was made for the audience that would see it physically?

There is a family-friendly quality to yarn bombing that allows these crafters to feel comfortable putting up work in middle of the day in front of observers. It is relatively low-risk. I assume that the association of this with “street art” and “graffiti” has to be frustrating for painters, writers, wheatpasters and sticker artists who wait until the wee hours of the morning to put up work because they risk being charged with a felony. Let’s repeat that: felony. There is a hierarchy of risk in the world of vandalism and street art is already understood as less risky then straight graffiti. Below both of these would be stickering which despite being regarded as toothless in some circles, can still have you arrested in certain cities. Yarn bombing would probably rank so low in terms of risk that it would fall on a separate page. Illegality does not make a work better or worse (though admittedly the risk factor definitely adds interest), but if the playing fields are not equal for yarn bombers and street artists why should they be classified as one and the same?

Here’s the contradiction: I’ve seen yarn used as a street art medium in ways that I thought were extremely imaginative and visually interesting. Works by Moneyless, Spidertag, and HotTea aren’t any less temporary, any less susceptible to decay (perhaps even more so), or any less legally benign than typical yarn bombing. What makes them different for me? The fact that these artists’ works could be identified in a lineup. Part of what has street artists and street art appreciators writing off the genre completely, as Conrad initially asked, is not the medium but the lack of creativity. A plethora of yarn bombers would like their work to be seen as unique or distinct, as any artist would, but are they putting in the effort in to earn that? Let’s look at a few examples of what most people envision when they envision yarn bombing

Photos by Alona Arobas (top), jimmyhere (middle),  Robert Couse-Baker (left), amy_b (right)

And here are the yarn-wielding street artists previously named.

Hot Tea (top), Moneyless (middle), and Spidertag (bottom)

Point made or need we look further?

Olek had always been one of these artists whom I’d come across frequently but always skimmed over with a sort of neutral reaction, like “That might be cool if yarn bombing were something that was cool.” Then the other day Jonathan LeVine Gallery sent me this video compilation of Olek’s work over the past year. Through the entire video, I was trying to reconcile why I still hate yarn bombing but why Olek was starting to feel like an exception. The reason is that she has moved beyond many of the drawbacks of typical yarn bombing. She has a relatively large body of work and it is not built solely on sweatering trees in different cities. The sheer size of some of her pieces are enough to make even biased observers do a double-take. Olek’s work does not last longer or decay prettier, but like Hot Tea, Moneyless and Spidertag, her personal style is identifiable. Unlike usual yarn bombs which don’t seem to be communicating anything specific, Olek’s work is often blatantly addressing the greater art community. Naturally, I don’t like everything but the versatility in Olek’s work proves that there is colossal room for creativity in this genre.

Yarn bombers, I encourage you to point out any shortcomings in this post, but more importantly I challenge you to be more creative.

Photos by Alona Arobas, amy_b, Hot + Teajimmyhere, MoneylessRobert Couse-Baker, Spidertag and StreetsDept


Category: Featured Posts, Photos, Random, Videos | Tags: , , , , ,

Yarn-bombing that doesn’t suck

October 31st, 2011 | By | 3 Comments »

Spidertag

Spidertag

I’m all for beautifying the urban world. Personally, I just prefer work that makes me think of cool stuff like Mission Impossible and not make me feel bad for not calling my grandmom. The work above is by Spidertag.

Similar stuff being done by Moneyless, but in 3D as well. Let’s see more yarn-bombing like this!

Money Less. Photo courtesy of Moneyless

Photos courtesy of SpiderTag1 and Moneyless


Category: Photos | Tags: , ,

Weekend link-o-rama

April 9th, 2011 | By | 2 Comments »

ECB at work on a mural in NYC with Robots Will Kill and OverUnder

Steph is here in Philly now and tomorrow Jordan Seiler, Gaia, and Marc and Sara Schiller will be here too. Pretty good week. Plus, Art in the Streets is almost here and I’ll be in LA for that. Hopefully see some of you there. Here’s some (Philadelphia-centric) news to enjoy over the weekend:

Photo by Becki Fuller


Category: Gallery/Museum Shows, Photos, Products, Random | Tags: , , , , , , ,